Research Observations: chance vs accident

 

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For a long time now I have identified in myself a predisposition to get easily sidetracked and distracted, a penchant perhaps to intellectually ‘wonder off’. A habit I have long since been aware of, and indeed referenced numerous times in new year resolutions, (see my Continue reading

Studio diary: 20/02

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Painting offers a way of working through an idea. Especially when working through a monochromatic palette without the distraction of colour. Even mindless painting without a clear agenda or goal insight will often generate something poignant or worthy of further exploration. 11th January 2017

I have long since admired Drawing’s immediate nature, Continue reading

Research Observations: improvisation

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Research Observations:

Below are a series of observations obtained during the recent collaboration on ‘The Landscape Scrambler’ project. Some are more closely associated with the nature of this particular project itself, whilst others, I hope, are more general observations upon the nature of improvisation. Continue reading

Profound wisdom / insight of the day#

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“Sooner or later every one of a painter’s possessions will get stained. First to go are the studio clothes and the old sneakers that get the full shower of paint every day. Next are the painter’s favourite books, the ones that have to be consulted in the studio. Then come the better clothes, one after another as they are worn just once into the studio and end up with the inevitable stain. The last object to be stained is often the living room couch, the one place where it is possible to relax in comfort and forget the studio. When the couch is stained, the painter has become a different creature from ordinary people, and there is no turning back…when every possession is marked with paint, it is like giving up civilian clothes for jail house issue. The paint is like a rash, and no matter how careful a painter is, in the end it is impossible not to spread the disease to every belonging and each person who visits the studio”.

James Elkins What Painting Is, p 148